Dr. Ana Bajželj


Areas of specialization:

Jainism; Indian philosophies and religions; Metaphysics; Cosmology; Epistemology. Topics: Time; Temporality; Causality; Omniscience; Karmic theory; One-sensed beings


Areas of competence:

Sanskrit, Asian philosophies and religions


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Dr. Ana Bajželj completed her PhD studies in 2013 at the Department of Philosophy, University of Ljubljana. Her doctoral dissertation, Nature of Change in Jain Philosophy, investigated the notion of change in relation to the general ontological model and the particular substances in the works of Kundakunda and Umāsvāti. The dissertation has been accepted for publication by Ljubljana University Press.

From 2009-2012 she participated in the research project “The Philosophical Relevance of Death and Dying” at the University of Ljubljana and co-edited a volume, Life, Death, and Dying in Intercultural Perspective, with the project director Dr. Maja Milčinski. From 2009-2013 she was a junior research fellow and teaching assistant at the Department of Philosophy, University of Ljubljana. In 2013 she was awarded a postdoctoral fellowship by the Indian Council for Cultural Relations to continue her research on Jain ontology at the Centre for Advanced Study in Philosophy, University of Rajasthan. As a Polonsky fellow, she will trace the development of the Jain understanding of time and temporality, placing it into the specific frameworks of Jain metaphysics.


Recent publications:

  • Nature of Change in Jain Philosophy (Narava spremembe v jainistični filozofiji), forthcoming with Ljubljana University Press, Ljubljana, 2015.
  • “Mahāvīra: From Heretic to Ford-Maker,” forthcoming in Asia: Biographies and Personal Stories (Part II), Education About Asia, 2015.
  • “Nonviolence Toward One-Sensed Beings in Jainism,” forthcoming in Nonviolence: Practical Applications and Theoretical Foundations, ed. Predrag Cicovacki, Motilal Banarsidass, Delhi, 2015.
  •  “When Earth Comes Alive: Earth-Bodied Beings in Jain Tradition,” forthcoming in Soulless Matter, Seats of Energy: Metals, Gems and Minerals in South Asian Religions and Culture, ed. Fabrizio M. Ferrari and Thomas Dähnhardt, Equinox, Sheffield and Bristol, CT, 2016.
  •  “The Jain Ontological Model According to Kundakunda and Umāsvāti,” Asian Studies, 2013, Vol. XVI, No. 1, 3–16.